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Protected: ‘Making Strange’: Exploring the Development of Students’ Capacity in Epistemic ...

Protected: ‘Making Strange’: Exploring the Development of Students’ Capacity in Epistemic Reflexivity

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Euson Yeung, PhD

Euson Yeung, PhD, is an assistant professor (Teaching Stream), physical therapist, and educator at the University of Toronto. His research and teaching centers around developing and assessing the range of competencies that support clinical decision-making among health professionals.

 

Barbara Gibson, PhD, MSc, BMR (PT)

Barbara Gibson, PhD, MSc, BMR (PT) is a physical therapist and bioethicist whose work investigates how disability is understood and addressed in rehabilitation practice and delivery. Her research examines the intersections of social, cultural, and institutional practices in producing health, inclusion/exclusion, and identity with disabled children and young people. She holds the Bloorview Kids Foundation Chair in Childhood Disability Studies.

 

Ayelet Kuper, DPhil

Ayelet Kuper, DPhil, is a scientist and associate director at the Wilson Centre for Research in Education, University Health Network/University of Toronto, and an associate professor in the University of Toronto Department of Medicine. She practices medicine within the Division of General Internal Medicine at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, where she attends on the Clinical Teaching Unit. She is interested in the kinds of knowledge and of knowledge production practices we see as legitimate within medical education and medicine more broadly, and in the ideas, individuals, and groups that are included or excluded. She has published more than 80 peer-reviewed papers.

 

Jay Shaw, PhD

Jay Shaw, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Toronto, and research scientist at Women's College Hospital. His work addresses the social and ethical implications of innovation in health care.

 

Stephanie Nixon, PhD

Stephanie Nixon, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy, cross-appointed at the Rehabilitation Sciences Institute and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, at the University of Toronto, Canada. She has been a physiotherapist, HIV activist and global health researcher for 20 years. She completed her PhD in Public Health and Bioethics in 2006 at the University of Toronto, and a post-doc at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa from 2006-2008. Stephanie is co-founder and Director of the International Centre for Disability and Rehabilitation. Stephanie is a straight, white, middle class, able-bodied, cisgender, settler woman who tries to understand the pervasive effects of privilege. In particular, she draws on the humanities to understand how systems of oppression shape health care, research and education, and the role of people in positions of unearned advantage in disrupting these harmful patterns. Stephanie developed the Coin Model of Privilege and Critical Allyship as a way to translate core ideas about anti-oppression to people in positions of unearned advantage.

 

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